Frequently Asked Questions
  • How do I find the depth of my bore/well?

Lower a weight on a LIGHT string into the bore/well until you feel it hit the bottom. Then mark the string at the top of the well, pull it out and measure the length of the string that was down the well/bore. NOTE. You need to use a light string in deep bores/wells, as the weight of the actual string can make is difficult to feel when you hit the bottom if the string is too heavy and the weight too light.

  • How do I find the static water level?

Lower a small bottle ( with a little sand or gravel in it to give it weight if it is a plastic bottle) into the bore/well on the end of a LIGHT string until you feel it hit the water surface. Then mark the string at the top of the bore/well, pull it out and measure the length of the string that was down the well/bore. NOTE. You need to use a light string in deep bores/wells, as the weight of the actual string can make is difficult to feel when you hit the bottom if the string is too heavy and the weight too light.

  • How deep should I submerse my pump in water

If your water depth is less than around 65m (195ft) put the pump down as deep as possible, but raise it up slightly off the bottom, so you don't suck up excessive mud and silt, which can block the piping in extreme circumstances.  The deeper the pump is submersed in water, the more it can deliver. Unless your compressor can deliver over 130psi (895kpa) pressure, 65m (195ft) submersion in water is the limit, or it won't lift.

  • How do I prevent my bore/well pumping dry?

If you have a low producing bore/well and find that flow drops off due to the level drawing down in the bore/well, run the compressor/pump on a 24hr timer. The length of each pumping session and recovery period depends on the performance of your well/bore.

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